January 27, 2021

Here’s How Audi’s Vehicle-to-Everything Tech Will Boost Road Safety

Photo credit: Audi
Photo credit: Audi

From Autoweek

If there is one piece of car technology we remember being promised about a decade and a half ago that is slowly coming true without hype, vaporware or unrealistic promises of transforming the automotive industry overnight, it’s cellular vehicle-to-everything technology, known in tech circles as C-V2X. It has the added benefit of sounding like the name of a background droid from Star Wars, and refers to the ability of cars to communicate with infrastructure, such as traffic lights and traffic monitoring systems, to increase safety and efficiency.

You might already take real-time traffic displays in your navigation system for granted, but C-V2X takes that a step further, allowing cars to communicate with each other and to communicate with traffic-related devices in their surroundings. This technology has already seen a limited rollout in Audi Q8 vehicles, displaying a countdown to green traffic lights to allow

Read More

Audi’s cellular vehicle-to-everything communications tech will save road workers’ lives

Audi CV2X Communications

New technology can warn road workers of oncoming traffic.


Audi

Audi on Tuesday announced that it’s working to improve the safety of road workers in construction zones. The German luxury automaker’s next-generation “C-V2X,” or cellular vehicle-to-everything communications technology, could significantly reduce crashes and fatalities.

This new system will work in conjunction with existing Traffic Light Information and Green Light Optimized Speed Advisory features that Audi already offers. TLI currently works at around 15,000 intersections in about 35 cities in the US, advising drivers of how long a signal will remain red before changing. GLOSA can advise motorists to travel at a certain speed to avoid hitting red lights, saving frustration and fuel.

Many vehicles on the road today are already equipped with modems that enable them to connect to cellular networks, but what

Read More