January 28, 2021

China’s vehicle sales pick up in September as market revives

BEIJING — China’s vehicle sales including trucks and buses accelerated in September as the industry’s biggest global market recovered from the coronavirus pandemic, an industry group reported Tuesday.

Sales rose 17.4% over a year earlier to 2.6 million vehicles, up from August’s 11.6% growth, according to the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

It said SUV sales set a new monthly record and purchases of other passenger vehicles also rose but gave no details.

In the first nine months of the year, sales declined 6.9% from a year earlier to 17.1 million, CAAM said. That was an improvement over the 9.7% contraction for the first eight months.

Auto sales already were suffering before China closed factories and dealerships in February to fight the coronavirus. Consumers are uneasy about slowing economic growth and a trade war with Washington.

Last year’s sales fell 9.6% in the second straight annual decline.

That hurts global

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Audi to launch new electric vehicle venture with China’s FAW



FILE PHOTO: The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Germany


© Reuters/Andreas Gebert
FILE PHOTO: The spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Germany


BEIJING (Reuters) – German premium automaker Audi AG said on Tuesday it had signed a memorandum of understanding with China’s state-owned FAW Group to launch a venture to make premium electric vehicles (EVs).

Audi has a long partnership with FAW, which is based in the city of Changchun in the northeast of China, the world’s biggest car market. The German firm also plans to make vehicles with Shanghai-based automaker SAIC Motor .

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Audi said it would produce models based on the Premium Platform Electric (PPE), a base developed with Porsche. It said the new venture would start manufacturing several models in China from 2024.

Audi aims to have electrified vehicles make up a third of Chinese sales by 2025. It sold 512,081 vehicles in China in the first nine months of 2020 and about

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What happens to discarded bikes from China’s sharing boom? Taxpayers pay to clear 25 million of them from bicycle graveyards

Three years after China’s blooming bike-sharing economy wilted, local authorities are about to send the last of 25 million abandoned bicycles to recycling plants, pruning the remaining blight on cityscapes left behind by dozens of companies that have gone bust.

All the disused bicycles must be scrapped by the year’s end under a compulsory retirement scheme imposed by city councils to ensure safety. The costs of taking them off the streets and the bicycle graveyards are borne by taxpayers, as all but three remain from a crop of as many as 70 bike-sharing companies, each plying China’s streets with a different brightly coloured vehicle.

“Most bicycle graveyards have already gone,” said Wu Guoyong, a Shenzhen photographer who made a name for himself by using aerial drones to shoot dramatic pictures of abandoned bicycles piled into little mountains in almost every major city in China. One such dumping site in the

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