January 19, 2021
car

Strict CO2 Limits Cause Electric Car Boom In EU, While U.S. Slumps

The share of electric cars on Europe’s roads has tripled since the start of this year, according to new data published today by campaign group Transport & Environment. By the end of the year they will represent 10% of vehicle sales, rising to 15% by in 2021. This is up from just 2% early last year.

There are now 130 electric vehicle models on sale in Europe, up from just a handful two years ago. By next year one in every seven cars in Europe will be a plug-in.

The reason for the sudden increase is clear. New average fleet CO2 limits kicked in at the start of the year in the European Union, limiting emissions from passenger cars to 95 grams of CO2 per kilometre. This is down from the 30g CO2/km limit required

Read More
car

Electric car sales triple in race to meet Europe CO2 rules

One in 10 new cars sold across Europe this year will be electric or plug-in hybrid, triple last year’s sales levels after carmakers rolled out new models to meet emissions rules, according to projections from green policy group Transport & Environment.

The market share of mostly electric cars will rise to 15 per cent next year, the group forecasts, as carmakers across the continent race to cut their CO2 levels. The projections are based on sales data for the first half of the year, as well as expected increases as manufacturers scramble to comply with tightening restrictions in 2021.

“Electric car sales are booming thanks to EU emissions standards,” said clean vehicle director Julia Poliscanova. “Next year, one in every seven cars sold in Europe will be a plug-in.” 

Under the rules, carmakers must reduce the average emissions from their vehicles to 95g of CO2 per km or face fines

Read More