January 23, 2021
car

CAR NKT cells offer a promising approach to combat hard-to-treat solid tumors

Natural killer T (NKT) cells, a type of immune cells known for their potent anti-cancer properties in murine tumor models, have been developed into a novel form of immunotherapy to treat patients with cancer.

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have genetically modified human NKT cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that enables them to specifically recognize and attack neuroblastoma, a form of childhood cancer. Expressed with the CAR is interleukin-15 (IL-15), a natural protein that supports NKT cell survival.

In the study, appearing in Nature Medicine, researchers present interim results from an ongoing clinical trial showing that the modified cells are safe, localize to tumors, and, in one of three patients, induced an objective response with regression of bone metastatic lesions.

Enhancing the tumor-fighting capabilities of NKT cells

The earliest

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US Army prioritizes open architecture for future combat vehicle amid competition prep

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army still plans to release of its request for proposals in December to replace the Bradley Infantry Fighting Vehicle, and it wants industry to prioritize an open architecture in its designs.

“The network is almost more important in some ways than building the combat vehicles,” Maj. Gen. Brian Cummings, program executive officer of ground combat systems, told Defense News in an interview ahead of the Association of the U.S. Army’s virtual conference.

The future optionally manned fighting vehicle will need the flexibility to be networked with other capabilities across the battlefield, and designed such that capabilities can plug into the vehicle at the forward edge. This realization was highlighted during the Army’s Project Convergence exercise at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, which wrapped up last month and during which an OMFV surrogate played a part.

The Army will focus on the effort to develop OMFV with an

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This All-Electric Robotic Combat Vehicle May Accompany Army Units into Battle

Textron Systems announced Thursday that it will deliver an all-electric version of its M5 Ripsaw Robotic Combat Vehicle prototype to the U.S. Army for experimentation next year.

Earlier this year, the Army selected a Textron team to develop its subsidiary Howe & Howe’s unmanned vehicle for the service’s Robotic Combat Vehicle, or RCV, Medium platform.

The Army wants to develop a light, medium and heavy version of the RCV to give commanders the option of sending unmanned vehicles into combat against enemy forces. The service selected QinetiQ North America to build four light versions of the RCV.

Textron is scheduled to deliver four prototypes of its 10-ton M5, which resembles a lightweight tank powered by diesel and hybrid electric motors, by the end of the year.

Read Next: Army Forced to Treat COVID-19 Infections Like Combat Casualties as Training Resumes

The Army also recently selected Textron to deliver an all-electric

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